disease illustration image

What is Gonorrhoea?

Gonorrhoea is the second most diagnosed sexually transmitted infection in Australia. It is caused by bacteria called Neisseria.

What happens if Gonorrhoea is left undiagnosed?

If left undiagnosed gonorrhoea can lead to serious long-term health problems if it's not treated, including pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) in women or infertility. This is why it is important to get tested as soon as possible.

How is Gonorrhoea spread?

Gonorrhoea is commonly passed between people through:

  • A discharge from the penis, which may be white, yellow or green
  • Swelling of the foreskin
  • Pain when urinating
  • Pain or tenderness in the testicles

What are the symptoms of Gonorrhoea?

For men:

  • A discharge from the penis, which may be white, yellow or green
  • Swelling of the foreskin
  • Pain when urinating
  • Pain or tenderness in the testicles

For women:

  • A vaginal discharge which may be thin or watery and green or yellow in colour
  • Pain when passing urine
  • Tenderness or pain in the lower abdominal area – this is less common
  • Bleeding after sex and between periods – this is less common

How is Gonorrhoea tested?

Gonorrhoea is tested using a sample of discharge picked up using a swab. Men can also be tested using a sample of their urine.

Treatment?

In most case Gonorrhoea can be treated with a single antibiotic tablet and a single antibiotic Injection. Most of your symptoms should go away with effective treatment.

How to prevent Gonorrhoea reinfection?

Gonorrhoea and other STI's can be prevented using these precautions:

  • Using contraception such as condoms when engaging in oral or sexual intercourse.
  • Do not share sex toys. Clean them thoroughly between uses.

Is there a notification for Gonorrhoea?

Gonorrhoea is a notifiable disease which means that doctors and laboratories are legally required to notify state and federal health departments about new cases. This information is treated confidentially and the statistics used for public health planning.

Source: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/gonorrhoea/